Posts Tagged: Broadcast

Lurpak makes food fun again

Be Wonderful and Wise – Lurpak® Lightest Spreadable

 

One of my coworkers shared this spot with me and I found it so inspiring. Not only will the narrating theme song catch you off guard but it will stick in your head for a long while. Just a warning. I think this is a perfect example of photography and editorial working in tandem to make something truly interesting. You have a wide mix of shots in different styles yet they all live in a close point of view, either of the food or of the cook. It feels much shorter than the 1 minute 10 second runtime and almost requires multiple viewings. Enjoy.

The Human in the Machine Interview #4: Director Jeanne Kopeck

The Human in the Machine is a continuing series of interviews with industry professionals focused on the relational aspects of the editorial process. Blog pages and bookshelves everywhere are flooded with technical information on the craft of editing, but there seems to be little out there on the human side of it all. Even though much of our work is technical based, what is at the heart of it all is spending 10-15 hours a day locked in a room, usually with other people, creating stuff. What makes those other people come back to your edit suite instead of walking down the hall to the next one? Why do so many editors and directors reference a “psychic relationship” where they instinctively know how the other would proceed with an edit? Some of my questions don’t even pertain to editing alone, but all work that involves relationships and collaboration. I think, especially in school, so much of the curriculum is geared toward the tech side instead of the human side. As much as it doesn’t seem fair, a big part of this industry is not based on raw talent and knowledge but on politics, connections, and people skills. You can either fight this truth or decide to train those muscles with the same intensity that you train your technical skill set. Hopefully each of these interviews give you a better idea of how to approach this human side of the business and how to create the work relationships that keep clients coming back for more.

Here is how Jeanne describes her climb,
I never started out to do this. I was a painter who got into computer graphics and effects work before a lot of other people…it was dumb luck, and a very fortunate meeting with Wyndham Hannaway. I consider him a God. Beyond that I have had the good fortune of working with wonderful people through the years who have given me a chance to try things, and who have been willing to share their expertise.
I worked my way up from the overnight “news” artist at KUSA, to Art Director in the late 80’s. Then spent 15 years at Citizen Pictures (went in as Art Director, left as President/ Partner). My time at Citizen was invaluable and afforded me the opportunity to direct. Five years ago, I left Citizen to form Mrs K, and though I still have a deep passion for broadcast design, over the past 18 years I have pretty much exclusively directed (hopefully with an artist’s eye). Our work is primarily national and international. In Sept. 2010 Peter and I took over complete ownership of Mrs K. and moved the company to Boulder. 2011 has been our most successful year to date. Life is good.

 

GM3- Based on your time spend locked in a room with an editor, what qualities created the best relationships. What were the worst?

JK- My favorite way to work with an editor is to take them through the footage, explain what I was thinking and leave them alone. I like to give editors space to think and take ownership of a project rather than dictate shot for shot. As a result, my favorite quality in an editor is passion. I look for people who are willing to spend time with the images/stories and can show me combinations I couldn’t have thought of on my own.

When an editor makes those unexpected connections, I’m in awe and feel I’ve witnessed magic.

GM3- What should an editor know about the director and her personality that would help the work relationship?

JK- Tell me what you think/feel….but don’t forget to listen. Before I shoot anything, I spend a LOT of time visualizing a project…so when I’m describing shots, I’m trying my hardest to give an editor a sense of “why” things look as they do. Take good notes.

I strongly believe that as “commercial artists” our job is not to showcase our personal opinions, but to find ways to honor and give voice to our clients stories/products etc. I think a mistake a lot of people make is to confuse this. The best description of this I have ever heard is “that’s why it’s called show business and not show art”. So, respect for that original “vision” and the client is imperative. I know this is a little confusing and sounds like a contradiction to my “bring yourself to the project” statement…but there is a distinction between finding creative solutions (expertise) vs. making it about what “you” think.

Also, don’t try to impress me with technical expertise…I don’t really care how it works.

GM3- How do you create a resonance with the editor and your client?

JK- By placing trust in the editor. Let’s face it…this is a business of relationships before anything else. When choosing Mrs K to execute project, a client is expecting us to make good decisions on their behalf. We take this trust very seriously. As a result, we spend a lot of time selecting our “team”. So, by the time I am in an edit bay, I have “sold” the editor and their capabilities to the client. In other words, they walk into the room already a fan…it’s the editor’s responsibility to keep it that way. Treat them with respect.

GM3- When working with an editor for the first time, what are you looking for in them to see whether there is a long term working relationship worth developing?

JK- Selfless passion and a wicked sense of humor.

GM3- What types of pet peeves do you have in terms of working with editors?

Don’t talk about all the other cool things you have worked on.
Listen first.

GM3- Could you share a little about your process is working with the ad agency? Where did the line cross from your vision and control, to their’s?

JK- It is ALWAYS their vision. My job is to help them execute that vision in the most creative and beautiful ways I can.

GM3- What qualities do you find in the clients you work with regularly? What makes you both click?

JK- Back to this being a business of relationships first. I think it’s really important to work with people you genuinely respect as humans. I am also old enough to not waste time on people who don’t care…passionately…about what they do. If you’re “calling it in” or just looking to make money…don’t call me.

GM3- What are your expectation of the editor and how they handle the project outside of just technical proficiency?

JK- I expect them to be open-minded, truthful…and more than a little talented.

Hanes makes me fear children, even more

This is a downright hilarious new commercial from Hanes. It seems Cronenberg’s Brood wants us to use recycled goods.

Scene Breakdown: Mad Men “Maidenform”

So I diverted from my plan a little with this post. In the last entry, I proposed that I would continue with the feature film breakdowns for a while before going to other mediums; but I lied. This week I was deep into a marathon of the second season of the exquisite AMC show, Mad Men, when one of the episodes jumped out as an excellent candidate for a breakdown. This breakdown is quite different as well, in that it looks at the opening and closing scenes of the episode. The beginning is a great little montage that really sets up the first dialogue scene perfectly and the ending is a beautiful capstone to all the story points covered in the episode. Even though they don’t directly reference each other I had to include both of them in this breakdown. Both scenes have my favorite characteristics of good storytelling; they draw you in and they stay with you after they have passed. Most of my analysis is from a film editorial perspective but there will certainly be comments that deal more with directing and the other disciplines. First, I have to give credit where credit is due.

Mad Men is a dramatic series created and produced by Matthew Weiner; following the inner workings of an ad agency set in the 1960’s. It premiered on July 19, 2007 on the AMC cable channel and has since cleaned up on the awards circuit, garnering numerous Emmy and Golden Globe awards. The episode I chose to look at is “Maidenform”. The Director of the episode was Phil Abraham, the Editor was Cindy Mollo, and the Cinematographer was Chris Manley. The first scene begins at the 37-second mark and is 1-minute long. The final scene begins at the 45-minute, 35-second mark and is 1-minute, 40-seconds long. As in previous posts, for a couple examples I used multiple screenshots over the length of one shot to show varying action and camera moves.

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1) To begin we cut from black. The song “The Infanta” by the The Decemerists starts playing instantly, also cutting on rather than fading in. The opening line in the song we hear is, “Here she comes”, then the guitar and drums slam in. It is quite appropriate to this montage, which involves the 3 main female characters in the show and serves the study in female strength that this episode deals with. From black, we are in a shot tracking to the left while also panning right to left. We move along a bed in a medium shot; 2-frames in, a woman’s arms and back appear. She is just finishing up putting on her undergarments.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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2) The frame moves up, showing the back of her head, and then to reveal a medium shot of her reflection in the mirror she is looking at. The camera stops panning and moves slowly in on the image as the camera switches focus to the reflection. It is Betty Draper, wife of the show’s main character, Don Draper.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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3) While still moving towards the mirror, the camera begins panning to the right and shifts focus to the actual Betty Draper, resulting in a medium close up of her profile. The camera continues to move around her, revealing more of her face as she evaluates herself. The camera move does all of the cutting for us and is actually 3-shots in 1. We started on her back, then saw her face in the mirror, then finished in shot of her actual face. In addition, the shot’s design is amazingly constructed in how it moves our eye across the frame. Initially, we watch the left side as her back comes in and follow it to the right as it moves past. Our eyes then flick to the left once her reflection comes into view. As the camera finally goes to her profile shot, we move back to the right side of the screen. It adds even more interest to this 16-second long shot that doesn’t feel even close to that long.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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4) Just as Betty begins a big inhale, the picture starts to dissolve. At the same moment the dissolve begins, there is a long cymbal crash in the music that goes smashingly with the transition. This is a 40-frame dissolve and is excellently composed. If you notice, Betty is on the right side of the frame while the image of the incoming character is on the left side of the frame. The incoming shot is tilting up across another woman’s dresser.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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5) Now fully dissolved into the new shot, we finish tilting up in a medium over the shoulder shot of Joan Holloway’s mirror reflection. She pulls an undershirt over her head, gives herself a final look, and turns away from the mirror.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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6) Joan turns and leaves the left side of the frame. The camera follows her reflection on the right and pushes into a new medium shot.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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7) Joan, now on the left side of frame, reaches down to the bed and, as she picks up a hangar, we begin to dissolve again. This is another 40-frame dissolve, but this time the outgoing image is on the alternate side of the frame.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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8) We are now in another tracking shot of a bed, with the camera panning left again. A third woman’s back appears in medium close up, also in her underwear. Getting a connection, yet? This woman is sitting on her bed and putting on stockings. The camera pans left until it settles on her outstretched leg, then stays on the leg as camera continues tracking to reveal more of her body in profile.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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9) The woman stands up to finish pulling up her pantyhose, which the camera catches as it pans back to her waist after she lowered he legs. As in the last 2 shots, much of what would be expressed by cutting between various shots of the setting is done through very well crafted camera moves. The editing in this is knowing when to start and stop showing these magnificent shots, and making them creep through each other with impeccably timed dissolves. You could have had cuts between these 3 shots, but the dissolves truly compliment the ever-moving camera. Cuts would have brought too much attention to the changing direction of the moves while the dissolves let them flow into each other.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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10) The camera continues to move, this time tilting up to reveal the face of our third main female character, Peggy Olson. At the same time the camera finishes its tilt, it also finishes tracking; and is now still for the first time so far. Peggy then begins walking left and out of frame.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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11) Just as she starts walking, a final dissolve begins along with another long cymbal crash in the music. I may be seeing too much in these cymbal crashes, but they seem so perfectly placed I have to think they are there by design. The incoming image is a solid dark color and as we progress through yet another 40-frame dissolve, Peggy clears the frame and we realize it is an office desk.

Glen Montgomery Video Editor Denver Colorado

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12) Just as the dissolve finishes a magazine slaps down on the desk for us to read. It is an advertisement for women’s bras. What a great lead up from this beautiful opener of women getting dressed. Just as the magazine comes to rest a beautiful audio cut goes with it. The music instantly vanishes as we hear a sound effect of paper slamming down and the violent ringing of office telephones. The shot hold for 3 seconds so were can read the ad’s copy, “I dreamed I stopped them in their tracks in my maidenform bra”. Well that edit decision stopped us in our tracks, for sure. After getting sucked into this slow, dreamy montage, we crash into the developing story at the ad agency with a quick movement and jarring audio transition. By dissolving from the last shot of Peggy into this mysterious desk shot, it is never given away that we have now moved out of the homes and into the office. Simply spectacular, and exactly why I had to include this scene with the breakdown to follow.

Glen Montgomery Film Editor Denver Colorado

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So that was the opening scene. One where the editing took somewhat of a back seat to the direction and cinematography; but as always, still essential to the complete artistry of the scene. First we see the product being used in the home then quickly go to the other side of the coin in the office dealing with the product’s advertising. All the while building on the issues of those strong female characters using these products.

Now, the second part of this breakdown is the final scene involving the main male character, Don Draper. This episode has 2 main themes. For the females, it is one of empowerment in a very male oriented world. For the men, it is infidelity. 2 of the main male characters have flings in the episode. Don has been doing it throughout the series, but in this episode, his lover brings up in bed the fact that he has a reputation for it amongst a lot of women in town. He reacts poorly to it; I think for the first time realizing how much of a habitual cheater he is. I could go on and on trying to analyze this, but that’s not why we are here. Hopefully that is enough background to understand the weight of this final scene.

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13) I’ll start with the medium wide shot leading into the scene. Don has just gotten out of bed and is walking towards the bathroom.

Glen Montgomery Film Editor Denver Colorado

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14) We have a jump cut into the bathroom where he is currently applying shaving cream to his face. It is a slight jump in time and space, but gives some separation from the scene that came before. A quick movement of the brush in his hand initiates the following cut.

Glen Montgomery Film Editor Denver Colorado

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15) We cut to a wide shot from a low angle behind Don. I wouldn’t say it was a matched action cut because I don’t think he was about to lower his arm in the previous shot, but the quick hand motion leads nicely into this one where he brings his hand down from his face. After a second, his daughter walks into frame from behind the camera and moves towards the toilet. Just before the cut, there are a couple frames where she begins to turn to sit down on the toilet.

Glen Montgomery Film Editor Denver Colorado

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16) In a medium shot, the daughter finishes sitting down and says, “Hey Daddy”. I would say this cut was much more of a matched action cut than the last cut I discussed; they certainly left out some frames on either side of the cut to speed up the daughter’s turn, and it works nicely. The camera height is closer to Don’s height than the daughter’s, as are most of the shots in this scene other than the low angle wide shot, so we know this scene is more about his perspective than anything.

Glen Montgomery Film Editor Denver Colorado

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17) Back in his original medium close up, Don looks in her direction, acknowledging her presence, then turns back to the mirror and say, “Hey You”. The shot continues in silence, save for some brushing and clinking sound effects, for another 3 seconds as he finishes applying cream and reaches down to the sink.

Glen Montgomery Film Editor Denver Colorado

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18) We get a quick cutaway to the daughter staring up at her father and smiling. My thought is that this is just a patch to cover a cut between two different takes.

Glen Montgomery Film Editor Denver Colorado

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19) Returning to Don’s medium close up, he begins shaving. We overhear the daughter say, “I’m not going to talk. I don’t want you to cut yourself.” As she finishes the line, he turns his head to look down at her. Halfway into the turn we cut.

Glen Montgomery Film Editor Denver Colorado

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20) We get about 2 seconds of the daughter just looking up and smiling. At this point the light sound of birds chirping starts up, which will continue into the following shot.

Glen Montgomery Film Editor Denver Colorado

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21) In a new medium close up from more of the girl’s angle of view, we see Don look back at her lovingly. After a moment he turns back to the mirror with a smile. The sound of birds has increased quite a bit in this shot. This shot is very different in angle and composition from the ones we have seen repeated so far, so it stand out from the pack and makes us pay more attention to what’s following.

Glen Montgomery Avid FCP Editor Denver Colorado

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22) We are back in the original medium close up after a matched action cut based on the movement of Don’s face and his lifting of the razor. This camera is already starting to push in when we cut to it, and moves in slowly throughout the shot. After a second the bird chirping sound effects fade away and we hear more of the scrape of the razor on his cheek. Don gives himself a more serious look, and as he slows and then stops shaving, a low, humming, rumbling sound fades in. I believe it comes from the musical instrument, the didjeridu, but not sure.

Glen Montgomery Avid FCP Editor Denver Colorado

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23) As the sound swells, the camera keeps pushing closer and Don stares disgustingly at himself. He quickly looks down and the musical tone cuts out, replaced with the squeak of the faucet being turned and water flowing. There are so many hints within these last 2 shots to the importance of this moment to the character. The camera change utilized in the edit to bring our attention to this shot, the new camera movement within this shot, the quick change in acting, and the changes in sound design all wrapped together to empower this story point. This is the moment where a philandering husband may have just seen himself for who he really was. Wonderfully done.

Glen Montgomery Avid FCP Editor Denver Colorado

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24) We cut back to the daughter’s medium shot. She now has a concerned look on her face as she asks, “Are you okay, Daddy?” There is a second of pause after her line before we cut back to him where all we hear is the loud flow of water.

Glen Montgomery Avid FCP Editor Denver Colorado

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25) The camera has stopped moving now and we see Don’s face in this new close up in the mirror. He is still looking down, dazed, and after a long beat, tells his daughter that she should leave him alone. He takes a long pronounced swallow just before the cut.

Glen Montgomery Avid FCP Editor Denver Colorado

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26) The daughter immediately looks away, dejected, and gets up to leave. Just as she is about to leave frame, we hear the squeak of the faucet again, the water stops, and we cut.

Glen Montgomery Final Cut Pro Editor Denver Colorado

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27) In the first frame of the close up again, Don is looking himself in the eye with a toweled half raised to his face. He never breaks eye contact as he wipes his face. The next cut is initiated by the beginning of his body movement away from the mirror.

Glen Montgomery Final Cut Pro Editor Denver Colorado

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28) We cut to the final shot of the episode as Don continues turning away from the mirror and sits down on the toilet.

Glen Montgomery Final Cut Pro Editor Denver Colorado

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29) The camera follows Don down and begins slowly moving away from him. As the move starts we hear the chirping of birds again and somber music starts to fade in. Looking down he mulls over the thoughts going through his head. Just as the door frame is about to obscure him, he slowly looks up.

Glen Montgomery Final Cut Pro Editor Denver Colorado

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30) The camera continues to move down the hallway away from the bathroom. Then on the opposite side of frame, Don’s reflection appears on a different mirror. After a couple seconds of seeing more of this reflection, we get a long fade to black before the end titles.

Glen Montgomery Final Cut Pro Editor Denver Colorado

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This long, beautiful camera move sticks with us in its ability to further draw out this important moment in Don Draper’s life, as he begins to acknowledge his mistakes. I sat thinking about this ending well into the end credits, and in the same way I was enthralled by the introduction to the episode I sat contemplating the end. Both are great examples of storytelling, but in very different ways and with drastically different feelings other than being tied together by characters evaluating themselves in front of mirrors. Please add your take in the comments section or give me your suggestion of titles to study in the future.

New Project Runway promo gives me the creeps…

and I love it!

It is no secret that Lifetime is the ruling channel of daytime television in our house. My fiancee works from home as well, so this is what she likes to have playing in the background as she modifies websites. It is not at all uncommon for 6 hours of Grey’s Anatomy and Desperate Housewives to follow me around the house each weekday. The main thing that attracted me to this promo was the music. I heard it coming out of the shower one day and though it was a promo for The Godfather. Also, I think the sound design is great. It is not extremely dense but the sound effect choices are superb. Each one is appropriate but stylized, and the more I pick up on them the more impressed I am. The editing speaks for itself. View away.