Scene Breakdown: The Wild Bunch part 2

If you have not read Scene Breakdowns: The Wild Bunch part 1 then give it a look-see, it will be important to understanding some of the building concepts in this final part of the breakdown.

So where were we?

Oh ya, The Wild Bunch. The trust in the team has started to break down and they have just discovered that their latest robbery has been a set-up. What they thought were bags of gold coins turned out to be full of iron washers. Here is the final shot of the last breakdown which was a wide shot of the bunch standing around their worthless loot as the leader, Pike, throws down his hat and exclaims, “Bastards”.

Colorado Film Editing

35) We cut from the group to the one person not in the wide, the old man. He begins laughing to himself.

Colorado Film Editing

36) The camera tilts up from focusing on the brother’s hands, throwing the washers down, to their shocked faces. Lyle says, “Washers?”

Colorado Film Editing

37) A cutaway to Angel sitting down shocked and defeated. I am guessing this was to give a little bit more pause after Lyle’s last line before returning to the two shot. His next line begins over the end of this shot.

Colorado Film Editing

38) Now Lyle is transitioning from shock to anger, and begins to rail out against the fact that they shot their way out of the town for a bunch of cheap washers. He is looking at Pike though and we feel that is where he is focusing this anger.

Colorado Film Editing

39) Pike verbalizes what everyone is starting to understand, “They set it up”.

Colorado Film Editing

40) Lyle gets angrier and screams back at Pike. Near the tail of the clip you hear the old man cackling and the brothers eyes’ flick towards him initiating the next cut.

Colorado Film Editing

41) Now in close up the old man howls with insane laughter then repeats Lyle’s question, “They?”, before beginning to move forward. This small movement makes the next cut easier to digest as the action continues in the following shot. They could have cut while he was still and then had him begin moving in the next shot but the action gives motivation and softening to the cut.

Colorado Film Editing

42) We are now back in the original wide shot master with the old man moving towards the group and laughing wildly.

Colorado Film Editing

43) The old man finishes walking up to the brothers in the 3rd Wide shot. His crazy outburst even threatens Lyle a bit, who raises one hand to ward off the old man while raising his other hand into a first. The old man begins a crazy spiel over the next sequence of shots in which he laughs, speaks gibberish, and overall seems to make a fool out of himself.

Colorado Film Editing

44) In the two shot, Lyle lowers his arms as he realizes he is not being attacked.

Colorado Film Editing

45) We now go to a new medium shot of the old man ranting. What is interesting is that the shot clearly breaks the 180-degree rule established by the rest of the shots in this scene. The filmmakers could have easily followed the rule resulting in shots of the old man from over the shoulder of the brothers or Pike, but instead the camera seems to be on the other side of the stone fireplace at the center of the camp. By breaking this rule, we get a shot that doesn’t have the character perspective it would have had with being on the brother’s or Pike’s side and its unconventionalism lends itself to the crazy nature of the old man’s apparent ramblings. It is a case where by breaking the rule it is in fact adding to the scene.

Colorado Film Editing

46) Pike looks down in his two-shot then back at Dutch as the old man continues mocking them. Although the man is acting wild, he is speaking truth in his comments about the set-up and this is acknowledged in Pike’s facial expressions.

Denver Motion Graphics

47) Now back to the odd medium shot where the old man mutters the line “Oh my, what a bunch”, which I think is the only time in the movie that alludes to the title. Please correct me if I am wrong though.

Denver Motion Graphics

48) Next, in the third wide shot, the old man does a crazy little dance where he pretends to throw money up his butt. I tried to get the most appropriate screenshot, but you have to see it in action to understand how weird he looks.

Denver Motion Graphics

49) In his odd close up the old man finishes his rant. He closes it by switching from the delirious laughter to pointed anger and snarling, “They, who the hell is they?” He then turns to walk away; initiating the same action cut that occurred at the beginning of his craziness sequence.

Denver Motion Graphics

50) Back in the original wide shot master Pike calmly answers the question as the old man walks back to his starting position against the fence. He answers, “Railroad men, bounty hunters”.

Denver Motion Graphics

51) We cut to a close up of Pike where he finishes his answer with a name, “Deke Thornton”. He says this name in the same calm manner but with a little bit more weight, which is complimented by the choice of cutting to the close up. Both the acting and editing emphasize the importance of this name to the story.

Denver Motion Graphics

52) This one shot is so important to this scene. It is a close up of the old man as he says, “Deke Thornton?”. On one side it gives even more emphasis to the name, again with the close up choice right after Pike’s and in the way in which the old man says it. With having both close ups right after each other it is as if the two men are having a private conversation and that they might know each other better than we think. It clears the old man of being as crazy as we thought based on his bombastic tirade. All joking aside, he is stone serious when he hears that name. He is an old timer who has been around the block a couple times, possibly a long history with Pike, and certainly not the senile horse trader we thought him to be. After saying the name, he takes a long pause then says, “He was one of them?”

Denver Motion Graphics

53) We see a reaction shot of Pike as he looks down for a beat of silence. This person they are speaking is very important.

Denver Motion Graphics

54) The brothers look bewildered for a second then Lyle lashes out at Pike again.

Denver Motion Graphics

55) With his back to us and the other characters, Pike is silent. From off camera, we hear Angel say, “Hey Gringo”. Pike begins to turn towards the voice.

Denver Motion Graphics

56) We cut to a new two shot of the brothers as they too turn towards Angel. This is from a lower angle that might be more representative of Angel’s perspective, which is fitting because Angel is the dominant force in the following sequence of action.

Denver Motion Graphics

57) Angel is still trying to ruffle the feathers of the brothers and chides them with “You can have my silver”.

Denver Assistant Editor

58) In the new two shot, Tector reacts to Angel’s jokes by beginning to whip his pistol out. He makes it half way through his draw when we cut back to Angel.

Denver Assistant Editor

59) As we return to Angel his is just finishing drawing his gun as well. The way in which the cut takes place half way into Tector’s draw and then seeing Angel finish his draw eludes to the fact that Angel was quicker and beat Tector to it. If it had cut after Tector finished drawing, then it would seem Angel was just reacting to Tector rather than them doing it at the same time with Angel being faster. Also there is a great sound effect before the cut of the gun coming out of the holster and then one of Angel cocking his hammer as he finishes drawing. Both serve the action so well and accentuate the standoff.

Denver Assistant Editor

60) There is a quick reaction from the brothers as they back up a little at Angel’s quick draw.

Denver Assistant Editor

61) Then we see Pike’s close up reaction to this new development.

Denver Assistant Editor

62) Back to Angel as he continues to tease the brothers.

Denver Assistant Editor

63) Then we hold of the brother’s two shot for a beat of silence.

Denver Assistant Editor

64) In the original wide shot master we see the old man, with his back to the group, reach into his saddlebag and quietly remove a rifle. At this point no one even flinches towards his direction and we don’t know which character he is going to train his gun on. Because we know so very little about these players at this point, this move by him could lead to a couple different scenarios. On viewing this the first time I thought he might be teamed up with Angel and he was going to get a jump on Pike and Dutch while Angel held off the brothers. It intensifies an already taught moment where we as an audience don’t know who to trust, just like the bunch.

Denver Assistant Editor

65) We pick up the old man now in his medium shot as he quietly cocks his rifle and walks out frame right.

Denver Assistant Editor

66) In the second wide shot we see the old man cross behind Pike and Dutch. I think if he was a threat to them they would react to him in some way, so he must be going to get another sight on the brothers and Angel. Although this little question of sides only really plays out over 3 or 4 shots, it is still a nice extra bit of intrigue added to an already tense standoff.

Denver Assistant Editor

67) Now we go to Angel’s first close up. I think this is the weakest of the close ups used in this scene. It does show Angel’s devilish facial expressions and maybe it is showing that he is focused on the brothers instead of the old man, but the fact that it does not have a clear drive differentiates it from the other powerful close ups used earlier. I would love to hear if anyone has a different take on this shot choice.

Denver Assistant Editor

68) Back to the brothers, eyes still firmly planted on Angel.

Denver Assistant Editor

69) In close up, Pike calmly says, “Go on, go for it”. We don’t know who exactly he is talking to, but by having the shot before Pike’s close up and the shot following it being of the brothers, the editor gives us a hint that it is them Pike is speaking to.

Denver Assistant Editor

70) Back in their original two shot, the brothers slowly turn back towards Pike, as he says, “Fall apart”. Pike is talking to everyone, but with the most emphasis on the brothers. At the end of the shot we hear Dutch say, “Walk softly boys”.

Colorado Assistant Editor

71) Then we cut to Dutch holding his gun. By hearing the threat off camera, it piques our interest to see who said it. When we go to that character we get a little bit more payoff than if we had cut from the brothers to Dutch before he delivered the line.

Colorado Assistant Editor

72) We get a stern look from Pike in his close up. It is kind of the exclamation point on the threat, a silent look that lets them know he means business.

Colorado Assistant Editor

73) The brothers stand down. Although we can’t see their guns being lowered, all their body language suggests they are giving up. As Tector bends down, Lyle gives one last look over his shoulder towards Angel, which dictates the next cut.

Colorado Assistant Editor

74) Angel holsters his gun and it seems our standoff is resolved.

Colorado Assistant Editor

75) Back in our very first wide shot, all the guns are lowered and the men move towards each other in the center of the camp. There is a downbeat music cue to further solidify the scene resolution.

Colorado Assistant Editor

76) I believe the resolution came in the last shot, but I included this one because as a final sign of no hard feelings, the old man throws Tector a bottle of Whiskey. It seems in most Western films, passing a bottle of Whiskey around is a key sign that everything is good again, at least for now. Also, I like whiskey.

Colorado Assistant Editor

So that’s it. 76 shots, a roller coaster ride of emotion in one of the best western films of all time. As I said in the last post this scene is all about a group unraveling. Every time you think the issues are dealt with something else comes up. You don’t know who to trust and in a group of criminals there are not a lot of reason to trust anyone. If you want a little more info on the film, as well as some interesting tidbits on the editorial process check out the Wikipedia page on the film.

I have yet to decide what film scene to focus on next. Hopefully something I watch in the next week lends itself to this type of breakdown. If anything, it damn well won’t be as long a scene as this one. As always, I would love to hear what your interpretations are as well as any suggestions for scenes to study.

3 Comments

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Glen Montgomery, Tej Babra . Tej Babra said: RT @glenmontgomery: Second part of my scene breakdown on The Wild Bunch now finished http://tiny.cc/191t1 #editingandpost #fb […]

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